Breaking Waves: Ocean News

09/14/2020 - 22:08
Aboriginal authority alleges the federal organisation built a walking track near Gunlom Falls in the Northern Territory ‘without permission’ Parks Australia, which manages the world-heritage listed Kakadu national park, has been charged under the Northern Territory’s Sacred Sites Act with damaging an area near the spectacular Gunlom Falls, one of Kakadu’s most popular attractions. The Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority alleges that Parks Australia built a walking track on a sacred site at Gunlom “without permission, close to a ceremonial feature of the sacred site that is restricted according to Aboriginal tradition”. Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 21:48
Green party makes electoral pledge that would make it mandatory for large financial institutions to reveal exposure to climate-related risks New Zealand’s left-leaning Green party said it would require the financial sector to make annual disclosures about the impact of the climate crisis on their business, if it once again formed a government after October’s election. The policy would be a world-first, said James Shaw, the climate change minister and co-leader of the party. “Australia, Canada, [the] UK, France, Japan, and the European Union are all working towards some form of climate risk reporting for companies,” said Shaw in a statement. “But New Zealand is moving ahead of them by making disclosures about climate risk mandatory across the financial system.” Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 18:01
Create more sustainable fabrics and boost textile recycling facilities, says all-party group The government is being urged by a cross-party group of MPs to take urgent steps to fix throwaway ‘‘fast fashion’’ by supporting the development of fabrics with a lower environmental impact and boosting clothing recycling facilities. After Covid-19 exposed its “faultlines”, the industry needs to follow a more sustainable route to survive, recommends the report from the all-party parliamentary group (APPG) for ethics and sustainability in fashion. Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 15:37
Smoke from the fires, which have burned millions of acres across the west, has nearly reached Hawaii and Michigan Four west coast cities in the US currently rank in the top 10 for worst air quality in the world, as wildfires rage up and down the western seaboard, cloaking the entire region in smoke. Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, hold the No 1 and No 2 spots, while San Francisco and Los Angeles sit at four and six. Collectively, with the smoke from the wildfires, these four cities have knocked every city in China out of the top 10 for worst air quality. Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 14:16
Democratic contender attacks Trump’s climate strategy Trump on climate crisis: ‘I don’t think science, knows, actually’ Biden: Climate change is ‘not a partisan phenomenon’ Trump to Woodward: ‘Nothing more could have been done’ on Covid Nearly all missing people accounted for as at least 35 killed US fires Sign up for our First Thing newsletter 1.51am BST Kari Paul here, logging off for the night. Thank you for sticking with us on these fast-moving news days. Here is what you should know from the last few hours: 1.15am BST The post office is shutting down temporarily in fire-stricken states As historic and destructive fires continue across the western United States, the USPS has temporarily closed post offices in California, Oregon and Washington due to fire danger and power outages related to the fires. As a result of the wildfires in CA, WA and OR, there are some temporary service disruptions. Please check our service alerts page for complete details. Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 12:20
Past three months were 1.17C above 20th-century average 2020 on track to be one of five warmest years, Noaa finds This summer was the hottest ever recorded in the northern hemisphere, according to US government scientists. Related: Bigger than London, bigger than New York City: visualizing the size of fires in the US Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 11:11
Leaked proposal includes carbon sinks provided by trees, soils and oceans in target The EU executive has been accused of “cheating” on its 2030 climate plans by proposing to include carbon sinks provided by trees and soils in its emissions reduction goal. The European commission will this week call for an EU emissions reduction target of “at least 55%” by 2030 compared to 1990 levels, according to a leaked draft seen by the Guardian. The proposal sets the stage for an intense political battle over the autumn to agree the target, intended to set the EU on track to meet a landmark pledge of net-zero emissions by the middle of the century. Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 10:26
Bermuda shutters schools and ports for Hurricane Paulette Hurricane Sally moves towards US Gulf coast For only the second time in recorded history, five tropical cyclones are churning in the Atlantic Ocean at the same time. Related: Trump dismisses concerns about coronavirus spread at Nevada rally – live Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 07:44
Swimmers and pleasure boats gather as Dutch city celebrates reopening of Catharijnesingel It is being viewed as the correction of a historic mistake. More than 40 years after parts of the canal that encircled Utrecht’s old town were concreted over to accommodate a 12-lane motorway, the Dutch city is celebrating the restoration of its 900-year-old moat. In an attempt to recast its residents’ relationship with the car, Utrecht’s inner city is again surrounded by water and greenery rather than asphalt and exhaust fumes. Continue reading...
09/14/2020 - 07:00
Ocean Leadership ~ Credit: OAR/National Undersea Research Program (NURP)/NOAA Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates – including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry – into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows. (From Rutgers University/ By Neal Buccino) —In a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers identify a cause for the “wrong-way” species migrations: warming-induced changes to their spawning times, resulting in the earlier release of larvae that would then be pushed into warmer waters by ocean currents. The researchers studied six decades of data on 50 species of bottom-dwelling invertebrates, and found that about 80 percent have disappeared from the Georges Bank and the outer shelf between the Delmarva Peninsula and Cape Cod, including off the coast of New Jersey. “These deeper, colder waters of the outer shelf should provide a refuge from warming so it is puzzling that species distributions are contracting into shallower water,” said Heidi Fuchs, an associate professor at Rutgers University’s School of Environmental and Biological Sciences and the study’s lead author. Many species of fish respond to the warming ocean by migrating to cooler waters. But the “wrong-way” migrators – which include shellfish, snails, starfish, worms and others – share a few crucial traits. As larvae, they are weak swimmers and rely on ocean currents for transportation. As adults, they tend to remain in place, sedentary or fixed to the seafloor. The researchers found that the warming ocean would have have caused these creatures to spawn earlier in the spring or summer, exposing their larvae to patterns of wind and water currents they wouldn’t experience during the normal spawning season. As a result, the larvae would be pushed toward the southwest and inland, where waters are warmer and they are less likely to survive. The adults stay in those areas and are trapped in a feedback loop in which even warmer waters lead to even earlier spawning times and a further shrinking of their occupied areas. The researchers compared this phenomenon to “elevator-to-extinction” events in which increasing temperatures drive birds and butterflies upslope until they are eliminated from areas they once inhabited. The effect on bottom-dwelling invertebrates is more insidious, however, because these creatures could potentially thrive in cooler regions, but earlier-spring currents prevent weak-swimming larvae from reaching that refuge. The researchers noted that these effects are influenced by… Read the full article here: https://www.rutgers.edu/news/wrong-way-migrations-stop-shellfish-escaping-ocean-warming The post Member Highlight: ‘Wrong-way’ Migrations Stop Shellfish From Escaping Ocean Warming appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.