Breaking Waves: Ocean News

11/12/2019 - 22:08
Swedish climate activist will join Riley Whitlum, Elayna Carausu and their baby, who have been sailing the world for five years Greta Thunberg will hitch a ride with two Australian sailing YouTubers on her low-emissions voyage from America to the UN climate change conference in Madrid. The 16-year-old Swedish climate activist had initially been stranded in the United States after the location of the conference was abruptly changed from Chile to Spain at the last minute. Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 21:29
As New South Wales and Qld fires rip through more than 1 million hectares on Australia’s east coast, residents like Ian Wheeler have spent days engulfed in smoke Ian Wheeler’s bloodshot eyes say more about the last four days in the so-small-it-barely-registers village of Killabakh, on the New South Wales mid-north coast, than he ever could. Along with his partner, April Walsh, Wheeler spent Wednesday the same way he’s spent every day since Sunday: engulfed in smoke. Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 20:58
Exclusive: email from government directs attendees at conference on climate adaptation to stay quiet on bushfire-climate link As bushfire conditions were declared “catastrophic” on Tuesday, New South Wales bureaucrats attending a conference on adaption to climate change were directed not discuss the link between climate change and bushfires. Bureaucrats from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment were sent an email soon after the AdaptNSW 2019 Forum began, causing consternation among some attendees who saw it as tantamount to gagging them. Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 20:20
Study finds greenhouse gases helped drive the scorching conditions in November 2018 that sparked destructive bushfires Extreme temperatures that helped drive historic 2018 bushfires in north Queensland were four times more likely to have happened because of human-caused climate change, according to a study to be published next month. Scorching conditions in November 2018 sparked Queensland’s biggest ever firefighting response as 1,250 fires torched 1.4 million hectares, destroying nine homes and causing widespread impacts across multiple farming industries. Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 19:01
IEA says deep disparity between words and action on climate change risks failing to cap global temperatures The world’s existing climate policies will not be enough to end the upward march of record energy emissions rising beyond 2040 without a “grand coalition” of governments and investors, according to the global energy watchdog. The International Energy Agency said carbon emissions from the global energy industry reached a new record in 2018 despite progress in renewable energy in recent years. Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 18:31
Wildfires are not getting worse globally, the Liberal MP says, but ‘actually declining’. All the day’s political events, live 5.00am GMT Nothing is happening (that’s Senate only week for you) and my capacity to deal with stupid is at an all time low after this week so far, so we are going to finish up a little earlier. Plus, the main thing is that everyone stay on top of what is happening with the fires, so make sure you continue to follow the coverage with that. 4.27am GMT I can’t see this tweet, because Malcolm Roberts blocked me on Twitter a really long time ago (about the time Adam Gartrell and my reporting got him section 44’d, and also our reporting on his staffer being accused, and then later convicted, of rape). But apparently Roberts has responded to this quote from Justine Keay with “Ok Doomer” Go away for a very, very long time, YOU IDIOT. 11,000 scientist or you....REALITY CHECK, you’re the stupid one. Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 18:00
Thunberg: ‘My message to the Americans is the same as to everyone – to unite behind the science and to act on the science’ If world leaders fail us, my generation will never forgive them As Greta Thunberg departs the US to sail across the Atlantic for the second time in a few months, she is leaving behind a simple message for those who care about the climate crisis: you must vote. Related: Giant Greta Thunberg mural to watch over San Francisco's downtown Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 16:29
Ocean Leadership ~ Veterans Day Meanders Imagine yourself in 40oF seawater in the North Sea, wearing a hard-hat dive suit. With near-zero visibility, you feel around a live sea mine to carefully locate the fuse mechanism that must be delicately removed to deactivate the mine and prevent catastrophic damage to ships and death and injury to passengers transiting the area during World War II. This was the work of Eugene Haderlie (biography), who, after his heroic experiences as a U.S. naval officer in the war, went on to become a renowned professor at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University in Monterey, CA. During the decades of his academic career, Dr. Haderlie conducted groundbreaking research in the Monterey Bay and along the California coast and was a brilliant instructor to hundreds of students. This included several naval officers like myself, who had the opportunity to take his class on biogeochemical oceanography while at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. I spent several surreal Friday mornings in waist-deep tidal pools identifying and examining various species of plants and animals, including brilliantly colored crustaceans, nudibranchs, and cephalopods that inspire wonder with their beauty and distinctiveness. These classes were a far cry and a long way from Dr. Haderlie’s work along the beaches of Normandy neutralizing explosive devices while under enemy fire just before the D-Day invasion, but to students who knew just a smattering of the wartime experiences that led to his love for the ocean and his lifelong pursuits to better understand it, they were made all the more inspirational. On Veterans Day, I reflected a bit on Dr. Haderlie, as well as the many men and women who have been part of the U.S. military’s effort to better understand the ocean for national security reasons but who have also done so with the full knowledge that this increased understanding would benefit our ocean and our planet in untold ways. Whether in uniform, as a civil servant or contractor, or as a research scientist or technologist at an institution supported by military research grants, thousands of individuals have made profound contributions to our ocean knowledge and the future health, sustainability, and prosperity that it will hopefully enable. So from the late Dr. Haderlie to today’s young Sailors who are learning to operate an autonomous vehicle that can explore the bottom of the ocean and find mines (originally designed at a COL member institution supported by a grant from the Office of Naval Research), I say thank you! Thank you for your service to our nation and to our ocean. Bravo Zulu! Member Highlight Ancient Molecules from the Sea Burst Into the Air From Ocean Waves When waves crash in the ocean, they inject tiny particles into the air (called aerosols) that carry organic molecules more than 5,000 years old. This discovery, published in Science Advances by Steven Beaupré of Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) and a national team of scientists, helps to solve a long-standing mystery as to what finally happens to these ancient marine molecules. Read our most recent and past newsletters here: http://oceanleadership.org/newsletter-archive/ The post Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-11-2019 appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
11/12/2019 - 13:25
The industry’s carbon footprint is under increasing scrutiny, but critics argue that offsetting lessens guilt rather than reducing harm Tiny clutch bags, conceptual knitwear and carbon neutrality – the ideas that fashion chooses to embrace each season aren’t always those you might expect. But thanks to a recent shift, no doubt spurred on by the “Greta Thunberg effect”, carbon – as well as the practice of offsetting it – has become a hot topic for many of the biggest names in the fashion industry. At New York fashion week in September, luxury fashion designer Gabriela Hearst staged fashion’s first carbon-neutral catwalk show. Hot on its heels, Gucci announced it would go carbon neutral with chief executive, Marco Bizzarri, stating that “the planet has gone too far”. Next up, luxury fashion conglomerate Kering, owner of big-name brands such as Saint Laurent, Balenciaga and Bottega Veneta, announced that its entire group would offset 2.4m tonnes of carbon dioxide in a bid to “become carbon-neutral within its own operations and across the entire supply chain.” Continue reading...
11/12/2019 - 12:15
Big floods likely to become more frequent because of climate breakdown Poor management of the rural landscape along with global heating and building on floodplains are the main factors that led to the floods that have engulfed towns in northern England, according to experts. Sheffield, Rotherham and Doncaster are among the places flooded, 12 years after they were badly hit when the River Don burst its banks in 2007. Many affected areas, including Meadowhall shopping centre, where customers were stranded overnight, lie within the river’s floodplain – low-lying land next to the river that naturally floods during high flow. Continue reading...